• top frame 
  • Ceramic tankard with an animated image of a shoemaker indicates some of the joy and social aspects of the shoemaking profession.  The inscription says, May shoemakers flourish and trade increase/and victory gain/Everlasting peace.
  • Magnifying Glass

This ceramic tankard with an animated image of a shoemaker indicates some of the joy and social aspects of the shoemaking profession. It also indicates the elevated status which shoemaking enjoyed within the trades. “May shoemakers flourish and trade increase/and victory gain/Everlasting peace.”
England, 1804
© Bata Shoe Museum, BSM P85.111

Dating

The date an artefact was made is very important information. Sometimes artefacts enter the collection with a very clear and inarguable date. This often happens when the date is found directly on the object as when an artist signs and dates a work of art. For artefacts that are not dated but do have maker's labels or marks allow us to establish a timeframe for the artefact based on the years in which the maker worked. Sometimes the dating of an object is related to its provenance, meaning the history of how, when and by whom an object was used or owned. Wedding shoes where we know the wearer and the date of her wedding would be a good example of this. For objects with no established date or provenance, specialists analyse the style of the artefacts as well as the incorporation of datable innovations such as aniline dye or plastics into their construction to identify the artefacts' date.