Japanese girl wearing a kimono and pokkuri at Shichi-go-san (literally seven-five-three), a festival day in Japan celebrated on November 15th for children aged three, five and seven.© José Fuste Raga/zefa/CORBIS
Japanese girl wearing a kimono and pokkuri at Shichi-go-san (literally seven-five-three), a festival day in Japan celebrated on November 15th for children aged three, five and seven.
© José Fuste Raga/zefa/CORBIS

Shoes for Children

Traditionally, shoes for children in Japan were not notably different from adult footwear.

Geta

This pair of geta illustrates the combination of traditional footwear with the new modernization, using the decal image of the steam train. Often children's geta are low and broad to prevent falls.

Pokkuri Geta

These geta, with bells sewn inside, are named pokkuri because of the sound they make when worn. A girl puts these on with her best kimono for a visit to the local Shinto shrine for Shichi-go-san, the celebration of children's 7th, 5th and 3rd birthdays.

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