Native tanned and smoked deer hide, glass, brass, velvet, silk, sinew, pigmentCaddo, 1909Made by Mrs. Sien-Coit SturmBSM P93.100
Native tanned and smoked deer hide, glass, brass, velvet, silk, sinew, pigment
Caddo, 1909
Made by Mrs. Sien-Coit Sturm
BSM P93.100
Native tanned and smoked deer hide, glass, brass, velvet, silk, sinew, pigmentCaddo, 1909Made by Mrs. Sien-Coit SturmBSM P93.84
Native tanned and smoked deer hide, glass, brass, velvet, silk, sinew, pigment
Caddo, 1909
Made by Mrs. Sien-Coit Sturm
BSM P93.84

Art on the Prairies

All Under the Big Sky

There is a pronounced similarity between the late 19th century moccasins of the Caddo, Kickapoo and Delaware. In part, this similarity reflects the close proximity in which these tribes found themselves once they were settled in Oklahoma. Like the Delaware, each of these cultures was relocated to the Plains by the middle of the 19th century.

Caddo

The Caddo had their traditional homelands in the south along the Red and Arkansas river valleys of Texas and Oklahoma. After the loss of the bulk of their land in 1835, they were finally settled on a small part of Oklahoma, where Caddo women made moccasins that were influenced by both Delaware and Kickapoo designs.

Kickapoo

The Kickapoo were also settled in Oklahoma in the second half of the 19th century. Originally from the western woodlands, their moccasins reflect Delaware influence in their cut and use of textile. The checkered patterned beadwork was a favoured Kickapoo design. The increased beading on the cuffs and vamps of later Kickapoo moccasins reflect a Prairie-style influence.
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