Nos-kah-noie and Wahn-shun-gah, Kansa Chief, c. 1902Charles Milton BellNational Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Museum, 52862
Nos-kah-noie and Wahn-shun-gah, Kansa Chief, c. 1902
Charles Milton Bell
National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Museum, 52862

Art on the Prairies

Otoe-Missouria

Some of the best examples of Prairie-style beadwork can be found on Otoe-Missouria shoes made at the end of the 19th century. The abstracted floral designs, boldly outlined in eye-catching white, are classic examples of the Prairie-style beadwork. Unlike the Delaware, Caddo, Kickapoo and Potawatomi, the Otoe, along with the Missouria and Iowa, had left the woodlands of the Great Lakes long before and settled on the Plains. However, their settled agricultural life augmented by seasonal hunts were equally disrupted by the Indian policies of the United States. At the end of the century, the Otoe and Missouria were producing beautiful Prairie-style beadwork.
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